3 Tips To Help You Find Your Dream Job

  1. Use a Professional Resume Writing Service

A professionally written resume makes you 38% more likely to be contacted, 31% more likely to get an interview, and 40% more likely to land the job. You can also earn up to $5,000 more per year. The main advantage is getting around the Applicant Tracking System (ATS) that most employers use to scan resumes. The ATS scans your resume and searches for specific keywords and phrases as they relate to the job qualifications. If the ATS doesn’t see the right ones on your resume, it might not even be seen by an actual person. TopResume has professional resume writers that know exactly how ATS works and how to craft a top quality resume.

2. Tell a Story in Your Cover Letter When Applying

Too often, people use their cover letters to just explain their resume in greater detail, but that’s not what a cover letter is about. It’s a way for you to tell a story about your career and specify why you would be a great match for the particular position you’re applying for. If you don’t research the company thoroughly and specify why you would be a good fit for the company, it may seem like you don’t understand the culture. I personally was never the strongest writer, so I struggled a bit with this. Luckily TopResume also offers a service that will write your cover letter for you. I reached out and told them about my career journey and they helped me turn it into an intriguing cover letter story. I never would have been able to come up with that on my own.

3. Take Advantage of LinkedIn During Your Job Search

These days, your LinkedIn profile is almost as important as your resume, if not more. Not only do most employers check your LinkedIn page after you apply for the job, LinkedIn itself is a great way to find a job. I tried to keep my LinkedIn profile as up to date as possible while working at my last job, but like my resume, I just never found the time to do it properly. Once again though, TopResume hooked me up, by rewriting my entire LinkedIn profile to make sure it was different than my resume. After that, I was having way more success getting responses from places I applied to, and I even started to see more recruiters reach out to me about jobs.

No one likes writing their resumes, and figuring out how to sell themselves to potential employers. Some people are naturally good at it. For those of us that aren’t, these tips and TopResume can make a huge difference. They certainly did for me.

Source: TrueSelf.com

LinkedIn Profile for Students and Recent Graduates

A resume or cover letter are important documents to have when applying for jobs. Networking is key to meet other professionals in the career you seeking while in college or after graduation. Creating a LinkedIn profile is very important to highlight your experience, education, and skills that will make you more marketable. Below is a LinkedIn profile checklist to get you jump started on your career path!

☐  PHOTO: It doesn’t have to be fancy; just use your cell phone camera in front of a plain background. Wear a nice shirt and don’t forget to smile!

☐   HEADLINE: Tell people what you’re excited about now and the cool things you went to do in the future.

☐   SUMMMARY: Describe what motivates you, what you’re skilled at, and what’s next.

☐   EXPERIENCE: List the jobs you held, even if they were part-time, along with what you accomplished at each. Even include photos and videos from your work.

☐   ORGANIZATIONS: Have you joined any clubs at school or outside? Be sure to describe what you did with each organization.

☐   EDUCATION: Starting with college, list all the educational experiences you’ve had including summer programs.

☐   VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCES & CAUSES: Even if you weren’t paid for a job, be sure to list it. Admissions officers and employers often see volunteer experience as just as valuable as paid work.

☐   SKILLS & EXPERTISE: Add at least 5 key skills and then your connections can endorse you for the things you’re best at.

☐   HONORS & AWARDS: If you earned a prize in or out of school, don’t be shy. Let the world know about it.

☐   COURSES: List that show off the skills and interests you’re most excited about.

☐   PROJECTS: Whether you led a team assignment in school or built an app on your own, talk about what you did and how you did it.

☐   RECOMMENDATIONS: Ask managers, professors, or classmates who’ve worked with you closely to write a recommendation. This gives extra credibility to your strengths and skills.

Source: LinkedIn

@davidsfountainofthought

How to Stop Selling Yourself and Start Being Yourself in an Interview

According to a 2018 Gallup poll, over 60% of people are not engaged at work. I believe this is likely due to not being in the right job, and, as a result, the amount of human capital and business value left on the table is unquantifiable.

If you are seeking your next professional opportunity, how can you avoid becoming a statistic? And if you already know you are unfulfilled in your current role, what do you do once you are invited to interview for a position that truly interests you?

Of course, you have to be able to demonstrate, through your resume and other professional documents, that you are the subject or functional matter expert for the role. You should also show you have been able to achieve the type of results that the hiring team will look for when they speak with you. I’ve found, through being an expert in executive coaching and career transitions, that these more technical factors are where most of us spend our time when preparing for the interview.

But from my perspective, it is highly likely that if 25 people have been selected to interview, all 25 will be smart, all will be subject matter or functional experts in the role to be filled, and all 25 will have read the same interview prep questions and written many of the same scripted answers to those questions.

My experience suggests that it is only by being you, and not selling you, that you will ultimately find yourself in exactly the right professional seat, no matter if you are starting your career or have already established one.

Follow these steps before your next interview:

Take the time to articulate what drives you.

Your values are likely what motivate you, so share with your interviewer how you will demonstrate your core beliefs in the role you seek to fill. For example, if you are leading a team for the first time, will you seek to build trust among your team and be clear enough in your vision so that you can hold one another accountable to achieve collective results? Can you listen to your team members in a way in which they know they have been heard?

If you can truly articulate how you will show up in your new role, there is no stronger demonstration of your leadership style. You should be able to describe to the hiring team how you will show up every day to execute on the role. Give them the ability to imagine you performing (and excelling) at the job. If you can do this, I believe you will make a lasting impression on the interview team.

Create your own set of questions for the interview team.

This helps you decide whether the role is a good fit for who you are. You should be ready to answer the questions you know will come to you, but it’s also important to spend time asking them what it feels like day to day to be in the role for which you are being considered. Don’t stop your questioning until you have a good understanding of being in the position. This is the only way to affirmatively determine if you will find yourself in the right seat.

Role play.

I suggest that you spend 20% of your prep time on articulating why you are a subject or function matter expert. Spend 80% of the time finding the right words to communicate who you truly are and how that would look on a day-to-day basis in the role for which you are interviewing. You might be self-aware, but a gap can exist between knowing who you are and articulating who you are in a way that’s authentic and succinct.

I’ve found that role-playing can help you hone this critical message. You can do this with a coach or a trusted friend; just ensure you are with someone who knows you well and can help you feel comfortable getting out of the “selling yourself” mindset and into the “being yourself” mindset.

Let go of the results.

If you show up in the interview being exactly who you are, know that you have presented yourself authentically, answered all the subject matter questions to the best of your ability and asked all the questions you can to help you ascertain whether the role fits you, then you’ve had a successful interview. If you have done these things, then the result — no matter which way it goes — will be the exact right one. If you do not get the job, it was likely because the fit was not right. If you do get the position, there is a much greater likelihood you will find yourself in the right seat.

Source: Lisa Walsh, Forbes

6 Tips for Internship Hunting

Are you stressed about not having a job after graduating with your college degree? Well searching for internships while you are a full-time student is key to landing your dream job. According to National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) 2018 Internship & Co-op Survey Report,

  • In 2018, the offer rate for interns is 59 percent, the acceptance rate is 77.3 percent, and the conversion rate is 45.6 percent. The acceptance rate increased from last year, while the other two figures dropped; this could be due to the state of the hiring market or the high number of eligible interns reported this year.
  • For co-ops, the offer rate is 34.6 percent, the acceptance rate is 80.3 percent, and the conversion rate is 27.8 percent.
  • The retention rate for intern hires after one year is 70.6 percent for those with internal experience (internship experience within the hiring organization) and 65.8 percent for those with external experience (internship experience with another organization). The retention rate for co-op hires with internal experience is 47.3 percent; for those with external experience, the rate is 46.6 percent. Meanwhile, the one-year retention rate for hires with neither internship nor co-op experience is 46.3 percent.
  • After five years, the retention rate for intern hires with internal experience is 50.2 percent and it is 52.3 percent for those with external experience. The five-year co-op retention rates are slightly lower than they are for the one- year rates (internal experience: 36.7 percent; external experience: 37.4 percent). The rate for no internship or co-op experience is 41 percent.
  1. A Not-So-Relaxing Caribbean Cruise 

    Ships are supposed to be majestic carriers, taking you on a journey across rolling waves and sun-drenched currents. Slap the word “intern” before it, and suddenly you feel sick and worried, cause that kind of ship (particularly finding one) isn’t always smooth sailing. Internships fall into that paradox of being abundant and rare simultaneously. There’s so many options, but that doesn’t mean every single one is for you. Paid or unpaid? How many credits? Part time or full time? College-affiliated or going rogue? You’ll spend hours thinking over the logistics. Then, you’re tasked with having to pick the industry, department, and actual position. Sounds fun, right? After you’ve narrowed down exactly how you want to spend a few months of your life for “the overall experience” (aka “something great to put on your resume”), you have the daunting task of actually applying.

  2. Try Not to Panic at the Intern Disco

    A common mistake people make is “panic applying” to internships just for the sake of applying. Take your time when applying. Don’t just apply to anything and everything if it’s really not something you’re interested in. You don’t want to be stuck with an internship you’re indifferent about. It’s okay to play the field, just make sure you have moderate interest. Explore your potential!

  3. Skills Pay the Bills! 

    Unique skills! Embrace them! Avoid comparing yourself to your peers; you may have an affinity for something that others wish they had. Think about it, someone applying to a communications internship probably has developed rhetoric skills comparable to a numbers genius applying to an engineering internship. Just like his or her respective interests, every student is different. Cliché alert: celebrate your individuality! Use your cover letter to highlight your strengths. It’s all about finding that sweet spot between humility and bragging, but don’t be afraid to build yourself up. There’s no harm in showing a little swagger.

  4. There Are No Meaningless Experiences

    What’s your worst-case scenario? You take an internship that maybe you expected to love, but end up dreading. The ending date can’t come soon enough. That’s not a worst-case scenario; that’s a gift. Wouldn’t you rather find out that perhaps this industry isn’t what want now instead of after accepting a job offer post-graduation? Or, look at it from the other viewpoint: maybe you take an internship that you thought you would hate and end up finding your calling! No matter the outcome, every internship and experience gives you a deeper insight into the person you want to be.

  5. No Sane, No Gain

    Remember, internships don’t exist to torture you endlessly through your college years, as hard as that is to believe. They’re a lot more than a skillset on your growing resume. Take a step back and regain perspective. Losing your sanity over application season is the easiest way to drive yourself into exhaustion. Keep a grounded head on your shoulders and don’t be afraid to ask for help. There are tons of resources out there specifically dedicated to helping students find their perfect internship.

  6. There’s Light (and Snacks) at the End of the Tunnel!

    Take a second, breathe in, and smile. Because as intimidating as internship hunting can be, it presents you with the amazing opportunity to find your interests, practice your skills, and direct you on a path to post-grad happiness. Not to mention, the free intern snacks…totally worth it.

HAPPY HUNTING!!!

Source: Chegg

Check out Chegg internship search engine here.

How To Stop Selling Yourself and Start Being Yourself In An Interview

According to a 2018 Gallup poll, over 60% of people are not engaged at work. This is possible because people are not in the right job and are only collecting a pay check. Organizations and teams with higher employee engagement and lower active disengagement perform at higher levels. For example, organizations that are the best in engaging their employees achieve earnings-per-share growth that is more than four times that of their competitors. Compared with business units in the bottom quartile, those in the top quartile of engagement realize substantially better customer engagement, higher productivity, better retention, fewer accidents, and 21% higher profitability. Engaged workers also report better health outcomes.

Take the time to articulate what drives you.

Your values are likely what motivate you, so share with your interviewer how you will demonstrate your core beliefs in the role you seek to fill. For example, if you are leading a team for the first time, will you seek to build trust among your team and be clear enough in your vision so that you can hold one another accountable to achieve collective results? Can you listen to your team members in a way in which they know they have been heard?

If you can truly articulate how you will show up in your new role, there is no stronger demonstration of your leadership style. You should be able to describe to the hiring team how you will show up every day to execute on the role. Give them the ability to imagine you performing (and excelling) at the job. If you can do this, I believe you will make a lasting impression on the interview team.

Create your own set of questions for the interview team.

This helps you decide whether the role is a good fit for who you are. You should be ready to answer the questions you know will come to you, but it’s also important to spend time asking them what it feels like day to day to be in the role for which you are being considered. Don’t stop your questioning until you have a good understanding of being in the position. This is the only way to affirmatively determine if you will find yourself in the right seat.

Roleplay.

I suggest that you spend 20% of your prep time on articulating why you are a subject or function matter expert. Spend 80% of the time finding the right words to communicate who you truly are and how that would look on a day-to-day basis in the role for which you are interviewing. You might be self-aware, but a gap can exist between knowing who you are and articulating who you are in a way that’s authentic and succinct.

Let go of the results.

If you show up in the interview being exactly who you are, know that you have presented yourself authentically, answered all the subject matter questions to the best of your ability and asked all the questions you can to help you ascertain whether the role fits you, then you’ve had a successful interview. If you have done these things, then the result — no matter which way it goes — will be the exact right one. If you do not get the job, it was likely because the fit was not right. If you do get the position, there is a much greater likelihood you will find yourself in the right seat.

For information or to see similar articles check out Forbes website.