How To Stop Selling Yourself and Start Being Yourself In An Interview

According to a 2018 Gallup poll, over 60% of people are not engaged at work. This is possible because people are not in the right job and are only collecting a pay check. Organizations and teams with higher employee engagement and lower active disengagement perform at higher levels. For example, organizations that are the best in engaging their employees achieve earnings-per-share growth that is more than four times that of their competitors. Compared with business units in the bottom quartile, those in the top quartile of engagement realize substantially better customer engagement, higher productivity, better retention, fewer accidents, and 21% higher profitability. Engaged workers also report better health outcomes.

Take the time to articulate what drives you.

Your values are likely what motivate you, so share with your interviewer how you will demonstrate your core beliefs in the role you seek to fill. For example, if you are leading a team for the first time, will you seek to build trust among your team and be clear enough in your vision so that you can hold one another accountable to achieve collective results? Can you listen to your team members in a way in which they know they have been heard?

If you can truly articulate how you will show up in your new role, there is no stronger demonstration of your leadership style. You should be able to describe to the hiring team how you will show up every day to execute on the role. Give them the ability to imagine you performing (and excelling) at the job. If you can do this, I believe you will make a lasting impression on the interview team.

Create your own set of questions for the interview team.

This helps you decide whether the role is a good fit for who you are. You should be ready to answer the questions you know will come to you, but it’s also important to spend time asking them what it feels like day to day to be in the role for which you are being considered. Don’t stop your questioning until you have a good understanding of being in the position. This is the only way to affirmatively determine if you will find yourself in the right seat.

Roleplay.

I suggest that you spend 20% of your prep time on articulating why you are a subject or function matter expert. Spend 80% of the time finding the right words to communicate who you truly are and how that would look on a day-to-day basis in the role for which you are interviewing. You might be self-aware, but a gap can exist between knowing who you are and articulating who you are in a way that’s authentic and succinct.

Let go of the results.

If you show up in the interview being exactly who you are, know that you have presented yourself authentically, answered all the subject matter questions to the best of your ability and asked all the questions you can to help you ascertain whether the role fits you, then you’ve had a successful interview. If you have done these things, then the result — no matter which way it goes — will be the exact right one. If you do not get the job, it was likely because the fit was not right. If you do get the position, there is a much greater likelihood you will find yourself in the right seat.

For information or to see similar articles check out Forbes website.

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